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What is PAS 24? Do you need it?

Posted in: Building Testing, Fenestration News

What is PAS 24?

PAS 24 is a set of tests designed to assess the security of door and windows against the effects of an opportunistic burglar. It is not designed to defend against a professional crook. The tests involved consider the size of tool used and the time it would take to be noticed.

Why do people need PAS 24?

To comply with current building regulations all new builds require door and windows to have test evidence showing they have passed the security aspects of PAS 24. This means that any company wanting to put their products into a new building must have passed the test first.

What is needed to comply with those building regulations?

The security aspects of PAS 24 is all that is needed. None of the operational tests are needed.

But why do we need it?

Because of building regulations, also people want to feel secure in their own homes.

But I am building a commercial building, do I still need it?

It is not a regulation for commercial buildings. However SBD may be needed.

Ok, so I must have this, is it expensive?

Well, it is more expensive not to have it. Once you count the loss of income due to not being able to provide doors or windows to new builds in the UK market.

So, if I have something tested, what is covered by that test?

When we test something, we ask for the largest configuration that you sell up to the size of our rigs. If it is done this way it covers the design for smaller sizes. Each different design will need to be tested, so if the hardware is changed but everything else stays the same they will need 2 tests, one for hardware type "a" and one for hardware type "b". It doesn’t matter how similar the hardware is, if it is from a different manufacturer then it will need to be tested.

Is it hard to pass the tests in PAS 24?

With the right hardware fitted correctly into a product which takes into account the hardware weaknesses with the correct fixings then it shouldn’t be. If the correct configuration is unknown then we can perform research and development at a reduced cost of a full test as no formal report is generated.

Right, ok so I want to go ahead with this, what now?

Contact our office or email us to arrange for a test date. After this ,a formal quote will be sent to you detailing the testing which you require.

How many specimens should I provide?

For a window we require 2 specimens be sent to us, for doors we require 3. These specimens must be identical and must have a subframe fitted around the door or window.

Why do you need so many specimens? They are expensive to make.

The number of specimens required is based on there being minimal cumulative damage across the specimens as testing continues. It is possible to perform the testing on fewer specimens, however this can lead to failures due to excessive cumulative damage.

A subframe? What’s a subframe?

A subframe is a frame around the door or window which is flush with the internal and external face of the specimen. This is fixed from the inside of the frame outward, to provide maximum support. This is usually made from wood.

What happens if the test fails?

Unfortunately, when a product has failed one of the tests within PAS 24, this results in an overall failure.

You mean we can try again? Is there any limit to that?

Tests can be carried out again as a retest, the important thing is that the specimens used for retests stay the same. If anything changes, then the relevant tests will have to be repeated.

So, I think I am ready then. What do the specific tests involve?

For doors the tests are as follows, these details are split into the ideal test order and which specimen they are performed on:                                                 

Door Specimen 1

Cylinder test part 1; where a selection of tools including: a set of curved mole grips, a torque bar set to 180Nm and a variety of screw drivers. These would be used to remove the handle plate get access to the cylinder, break it and unlock the door.

Cylinder test part 2; where a selection of tools including the ones above plus a self-drilling traction screw to screw into the cylinder and remove the cylinder.

Manual Check Test; where a large screw driver and small crowbar are used in combination to attempt to reveal weaknesses in the product which are not part of the hardware system. This test is the only test which is not considered a pass or fail for the entire test, it is designed to look for vulnerabilities which would then be added as extra points on the mechanical load test below.

Door Specimen 2

Mechanical Test on Infill; this is 2kN perpendicular force applied to all four corners of the infill medium, where there is a difference in infill retention system or medium this is repeated.

Manipulation Test a; Using a mixture of very small tools like small headed screw drivers, craft knives and paint scrapers we test the different points of hardware to see if any fixings can be manipulated in a way to circumvent the systems in place to stop entry.

Manual Cutting Test; Using chisels and craft knives this test involves two parts. The first part is to attempt to cut a 50mm hole through the material of the door leaf or infill panel (if it’s not glass) within a horizontal band 400mm either side of the centre rotational locking hardware i.e. the cylinder. The second test is to attempt to cut a much larger hole 380mm x 225mm outside of the zone defined in the first cutting test.

Mechanical Loading Test and Additional Mechanical Loading test; This is a series of perpendicular pushes and in plane pulls to mimic the forces applied by a crowbar but in a standardised fashion. For lift and slide doors the most onerous loads are the ones which take place on the interlock which is 4.5kN in either direction to split the interlock apart and the loads which are 4.5kN in the direction of opening.

Manipulation Test b; using the same tools in manipulation test b this test is to take place after the mechanical load test to see if there are any points where fixings can be done and the door or window can be opened.

Door Specimen 3

Manual Test on Infill; for each type of infill retention system or infill medium this test is repeated. Using a selection of tools such as paint scrapers, chisels and craft knives we attempt to remove the glazing or infill from the external face of the doorset or window.

Soft Body Impact Test; this is 3 impact points of 3 impacts on the centre of the door leaves and any central join with a 30kg sand bag which has a drop height of 800mm.

Hard Body Impact Test; this is 3 impacts on the corners of the door leaves and any hardware points with a 50kg steel ram which has a drop height of 165mm. If there is any non-glass infill medium then this will also be impacted in this way.

And what about Windows?

For windows the tests are as follows, again this is split into the ideal test order and which specimen the tests are ideally performed on:

Window Specimen 1

Manipulation Test a; Using a mixture of very small tools like small headed screw drivers, craft knives and paint scrapers we test the different points of hardware to see if any fixings can be manipulated in a way to circumvent the systems in place to stop entry.

Manual Test on Infill; for each type of infill retention system or infill medium this test is repeated. Using a selection of tools such as paint scrapers, chisels and craft knives we attempt to remove the glazing or infill from the external face of the doorset or window.

Manual Check Test; where a large screw driver and small crowbar are used in combination to attempt to reveal weaknesses in the product which are not part of the hardware system. This test is the only test which is not considered a pass or fail for the entire test, it is designed to look for vulnerabilities which would then be added as extra points on the mechanical load test below.

Window Specimen 2

Mechanical Test on Infill; this is 2kN perpendicular force applied to all four corners of the infill medium, where there is a difference in infill retention system or medium this is repeated.

Mechanical Loading Test and Additional Mechanical Loading test; This is a series of perpendicular pushes and in plane pulls to mimic the forces applied by a crowbar but in a standardised fashion.

Manipulation Test "b"; using the same tools in manipulation Test "b" this test is to take place after the mechanical load test to see if there are any points where fixings can be done and the door or window can be opened.

 

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